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What a beheading feels like

What a beheading feels like

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Man Reveals How He Lost 168 Pounds After His Girlfriend Cheated on Him?

The ultimate motivator turned out to be infidelity

Getting cheated on by your significant other is a heart-wrenching experience to endure; however, it can also turn out to be a powerful motivator, as this English man, Mike Vaughn, has come to discover.

Vaughn, who at his heaviest weighed 444 pounds, was struggling with his goal to lose weight, or even control it. Then, the hammer fell: His girlfriend had been cheating on him, to boot. Despite the devastating setback, though, Vaughn steeled his resolve and got to work. (Worried that the love of your life may be doing the same? Here's when she's most likely to start cheating on you.)

"My life could have gone in one of two ways," he told the Daily Mail. "Go back into a depression and comfort eat and go back to square one, or use it as motivation to really improve my life. I wasn't going to let something like that destroy everything I had worked for, I would use it to spur me on and I did."

Since then, he's changed his diet, committed to his fitness, and has seen major results: In fact, he's now lost 168 pounds—and he isn't finished yet.

"I put everything into my diet and training, and I can honestly say now I've never been happier," he said. "Since then I've found the consistency that I needed so much. Her cheating was a blessing in disguise."

Vaughn completely overhauled his diet by cutting out chips, soda, burgers, and pizza; instead replacing them with water, salads, and regular servings of eggs, fish, and vegetables. But he experienced his first weight-loss breakthrough when, at the recommendation of a friend, he took part in a six-week exercise "boot camp." From there, he joined a nearby gym, where he became a member of a group personal training program. Since then, his heartbreaking story has culminated in a happy, healthy ending.

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6 Reasons More Farms Should Grow Mushrooms

From reducing waste to amending soil, fungi might be a farmer’s new best friend.

It’s a lot easier to grow mushrooms today than it ever has been. For decades, most of the mushrooms we ate came from giant farms using lab-based cultivation practices that required expensive equipment and demanding degrees of precision. In recent years, however, small farmers and home growers have had access to more accessible and efficient practices—and they’re helping to spread those practices by sharing them online.

But what most people don’t know is that mushrooms are more than a popular food. They can also be grown in ways that improve the overall health and efficiency of plant and animal systems. Here are six ways in which mushrooms are more than just a superfood.

1. Creating Food from Waste

Most farms produce tons of agricultural waste that is often burned or composted. But as nature’s great recyclers, fungi are able to break down nearly any carbon-based material, from woody trees to industrial pollutants. Multiple commercial mushroom species have been shown to grow on over 200 agricultural residues, including corncobs, bamboo shoots, potato leaves, soybean hulls, and peanut shells. Rather than placing all the value on the seed or fruit of a given crop, farmers could start to see that the other 80 to 90 percent of the plant as food for another crop entirely: edible and medicinal mushrooms.

2. Filling the Downtime

Though mushrooms can be grown year-round, it’s especially ideal to grow them during the winter months when other local foods are only minimally available in most of the U.S. Not only is this a time when farmers are looking for a bump in revenue, it’s also perfect for growing mushrooms, as the cooler temperatures and higher humidity levels are ideal growing conditions. Their growing cycles take 1 to 3 months, depending on the species, allowing farmers to time their mushroom crops around their harvest season. Mushrooms can be also be grown indoors with minimum infrastructural investment during the summer months between planting and harvesting vegetable crops.

3. Provide Missing Nutrients

Cultivated varieties such as Shiitake and oyster mushrooms provide many nutrients that other vegetables are low in or lack entirely. Most mushrooms species are high in various B vitamins, while others contain an abundance of vitamin C. All mushrooms have ergosterol—a compound called a vitamin D precursor—in their cell walls. When fresh or dried mushrooms are placed in direct sunlight, this compound naturally converts to vitamin D, often to significant levels within just a few hours.

Mushrooms are also an excellent source of macronutrients like calcium, magnesium, sodium, potassium, and phosphorus, as well as the microelements copper, iron, selenium, manganese, and zinc. Unlike many health supplements, the minerals in mushrooms are often found in an ionic form that is easy for the body to assimilate. Mushrooms are also one of the few organic sources of germanium and selenium, elements that have been shown to increase resistance to diseases and combat harmful free radicals. When fresh, mushrooms contain around 3.5 to 4 percent protein and around 19 to 35 percent when dried. Many mushrooms contain all of the essential amino acids, with some species being among the highest natural sources of lysine.

Beyond their nutritional value, mushrooms are also highly regarded for their medicinal value. Cultivated mushrooms such as Reishi and Turkey Tail have also been found to stimulate and support immune function.

4. Improving Animal Feed

Once mushrooms have been harvested, the protein- and vitamin-rich fermented agricultural waste they grew on can be fed to ruminants and other farm animals. Many studies have shown that chickens, fish, lambs, cattle, and other farm animals all benefit from eating mushrooms and their mycelium. Researchers found that these animals showed significant improvements in overall health, digestion, and disease resistance. When medicinal Cordyceps mushrooms are fed to chickens, some of the medicinal compounds in the mushroom can also pass into the animal’s eggs, suggesting the future production of many novel medicinal mushroom-egg-based products.

5. Building Soil

Another use for cultivation leftovers is as a soil amendment. Some nurseries sell commercial mushroom compost, which is nothing more than the residues of the Portobello mushroom industry. The homemade version offers the same benefits, such as increased water holding capacity and nutrient availability. Most mushroom growers don’t use this “waste.” So even if you don’t grow mushrooms, you might be able to get some of these leftovers (known in the trade as “spent spawn”) for free.

6. Supporting Crops and Cutting Fertilizer

Lastly, mycorrhizal fungi can significantly improve the nutritional quality and overall health of crops. These important fungi connect with the roots of 90 to 95 percent of plants in the world, where they help acquire nutrients the plant roots cannot. This is most notable with phosphorus, which these fungi can make soluble (usable) from clays and rocks or through the digestion of organic matter. As a result, farmers can use significantly less fertilizer and produce the same quantity of food.

These are just a few examples of the many ways fungi can be integrated into modern and future food systems. We have already seen mushroom-growing play a role in creating high-quality foods, healthy soils, and new industries—what else will the mycocultural revolution bring?

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Fake news is great news. The more, the better. Because it undermines the media's credibility.

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Family Claims Wide-Awake Surgery Led to Minister's Suicide

In the last two weeks of his life, Sherman Sizemore felt like people were trying to bury him alive.

Now, more than a year later, members of his family say the horrifying experience of being conscious during surgery but unable to move or speak led directly to the Beckley minister's suicide — perhaps the first such case in the country.

Advocates say Sizemore's death should draw attention to a little-discussed phenomenon called anesthesia awareness that could happen to between 20,000 and 40,000 people a year in America.

In some instances, patients might be conscious for only a few seconds, but cases like Sizemore's, where people remain conscious for most of their surgery, can lead to post-traumatic stress, experts say.

"It's the first time I know of anyone succeeding in taking their own lives because of this, but suicidal thoughts are not all that uncommon," said Carol Weihrer, president of the Virginia-based Anesthesia Awareness Campaign, which she founded after her own experience with anesthesia awareness.

Sizemore, a former coal miner and Baptist minister, was admitted to Raleigh General Hospital on Jan. 19, 2006, for surgery aimed at diagnosing the cause of abdominal pain, according to a lawsuit filed March 13 in Raleigh County Circuit Court.

An anesthesiologist and nurse anesthetist who worked for Raleigh Anesthesia Associates gave Sizemore paralyzing drugs to prevent his muscles from jerking and twitching during the surgery, the complaint alleges. But it says they failed to give him general anesthesia to render him unconscious until 29 minutes into the procedure — 16 minutes after the first cut into his abdomen.

Sizemore was awake for the procedure, but couldn't speak or move. Worse, the complaint charges, Sizemore was never told that he hadn't been properly anesthetized, and was tormented by doubts about whether his memories were real.

The lawsuit, filed against Raleigh Anesthesia Associates by two of his daughters, goes on to say that in the two weeks after his surgery, Sizemore became a different person. He couldn't sleep, refused to be left alone, suffered nightmares and complained people were trying to bury him alive.

On Feb. 2, 2006, Sizemore killed himself. His family says he had no history of psychological distress before his surgery.

"Being helpless and being in that situation can obviously be tough on people's psychological well-being," said Tony O'Dell, a Charleston lawyer who filed the complaint, which seeks unspecified damages.

Calls to Raleigh Anesthesia Associates were referred to Charleston lawyer Bill Foster, who said he wouldn't comment until he had more time to study the complaint.

Anesthesia awareness — also called unintended intraoperative awareness — happens when a patient who should be under general anesthesia is aware of some or all of a surgical procedure. Causes can include doctor errors, faulty equipment or patients who can't take a deep level of anesthesia, as with some trauma cases or emergency heart surgeries.

The Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations cites studies that show anesthesia awareness could happen in 0.1 to 0.2 percent of surgeries involving general anesthesia in this country — or between 20,000 and 40,000 a year. Patients who have experienced it often report sensations of not being able to breathe and feeling pain. Half of all patients also report mental distress after the surgery, including post-traumatic stress disorder.

In 2005, the American Society of Anesthesiologists adopted guidelines calling for doctors to follow a checklist protocol for anesthesia equipment to make sure proper doses are being delivered. However, the ASA stopped short of endorsing brain-monitoring equipment as a standard of care, saying doctors should decide on a case-by-case basis whether such machines are necessary.

"It could be that some day everybody who gets anesthesia will have a brain-wave monitor," said Dr. Robert Johnstone, a professor of anesthesiology at the West Virginia University School of Medicine.

Johnstone says such monitors are used at WVU, but in conjunction with a range of other equipment anesthesiologists use to measure everything from blood pressure to body temperature. When such monitors and tests are used properly, he said, the chance of someone being awake for a lengthy surgery is slim.

It was not clear whether Raleigh General uses such monitors. Calls to the hospital were not immediately returned Monday.

"The incidence of unintended awareness is rare," said Lisa Thiemann, director of practice for the American Association of Nurse Anesthetists. But she said the organization is concerned enough about it to adopt its own guidelines, including calls for hospitals to conduct post-surgery interviews with patients to learn whether they were awake during surgery.

Weihrer said that recognition of the experience and proper psychological counseling is often the only thing patients want.

"The reason people sue is because they want to be acknowledged," said Weihrer, who won an out-of-court settlement after her anesthesia failed during a five-hour eye surgery in 1998. "They don't want to be told 'you weren't awake, it was a dream.' I hate the word 'dream."'

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Native European men are stupid if they pursue sexual relationships with Western women. Go to India and Pakistan. Every native college girl dreams of a white husband.

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Antibacterial activity of Eurycoma longifolia Jack

Eurycoma longifolia (E. longifolia) Jack, known locally as Tongkat Ali originates from Southeast Asia including Indonesia, Malay Peninsula, Thailand, Laos, Cambodia and Vietnam. 1 All parts of E. longifolia plant, in particularly the roots have long been used medicinally. The bark of the roots is used in the Malay Peninsula to relieve fever, ulcers in the mouth, and intestinal worms. 2 It is also used traditionally as a blood coagulant for complication during childbirth and as an aphrodisiac. 3 At present, there are many studies on the chemical and biological activities of E. longifolia . For biological activities, it was reported that methanol, n-butanol and chlorophorm root extract except water extract of E. longifolia produced a significant cytotoxicity effect against KB, DU-145, RD, MCF-7, CaOV-3, and MBBK cell lines. 4 By using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and mass spectral data, 65 compounds were isolated from the root extract of E. longifolia and screened for cytotoxicity, anti- HIV and anti-malarial activity. Eight of these compounds demonstrated strong cytotoxicity against human lung cancer (A-549) cell lines, 7 compounds exhibited strong cytotoxicity towards human breast cancer (MCF-7) cell lines while 2 displayed anti-malarial activity. 5 It was also shown that E. longifolia stem extract exhibits a highly positive nematicidal activity. 6 Eurycoma longifolia root extract has been shown to possess antipyretic, plant growth inhibition and a direct antiproliferative activity on MCF-7 cells by inducing apoptosis through the modulation of Bcl-2 protein (down regulation of the anti apoptotic Bcl-2 protein). 7 In recent years, multiple resistances in human pathogenic microorganisms have developed due to the indiscriminate use of commercial antimicrobial drugs commonly employed in the treatment of infectious diseases. Screening of plant extract and plant product for antimicrobial activity has shown that higher plants represent a potential source of a new antimicrobial agents. 8,9 The present study was conducted to investigate antibacterial activity of leaves, stem and root of E. longifolia against pathogenic Gram- positive and Gram-negative bacteria.

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Pedophile sting ops roil U.S. forces on Okinawa

Controversial operations in which sailors pose online as underage girls lead to dozens of NCIS arrests

Since 2015, at least 36 U.S. service members on Okinawa have been arrested in child sex stings operated by the Naval Criminal Investigative Service.

Those detained have belonged to all branches of the military — with marines in the majority — and their ranks have ranged from private to lieutenant colonel. Typically they have received sentences of between two and three years in military prison, and upon their release they will be required to register as sex offenders in the United States.

Details of the operations were revealed by two American lawyers — Timothy J. Bilecki and Stephen H. Carpenter Jr. — who have represented some of those service members arrested. Both lawyers have criticized the methods employed by the U.S. Navy’s law enforcement agency.

According to Honolulu-based Bilecki, in the operations, NCIS agents task female sailors with posting messages online, including in the personals section of Craigslist and on the Whisper messaging app. After being contacted by service members, the sailors pose as bored young women, engage in sexually provocative chat and, at some point during the conversations, they describe their ages as 14 or 15 years old. NCIS agents arrest the service members when they go to meet the females in person — either at a house temporarily leased to the NCIS within Kadena Air Base or an ice cream shop in American Village, a popular tourist area in Chatan Town.

The operations have been nicknamed “To Catch A Predator” due to their similarities to the contentious NBC reality TV show that aired from 2004 to 2007.

Basing his estimates on U.S. Marine Corps records, Bilecki says the Okinawa operations have netted at least 36 service members, but he believes the actual number may be as high as 50.

Contacted by The Japan Times, the NCIS declined to comment on the operations, saying it does not discuss the details of ongoing investigations.

According to its website, the NCIS is comprised of more than 2,300 members in approximately 40 countries tasked with investigating major criminal cases involving or targeting the U.S. Navy and Marine Corps. Its special agents can conduct arrests of service members and civilians on- and off-base. In Japan, the NCIS is headquartered at Yokosuka Naval Base, Kanagawa Prefecture, with four subordinate offices, including one at Camp Foster, Okinawa, from where it is believed the sting operations are directed.

Bilecki is highly critical of the way the NCIS conducts the operations. He says following the arrests, NCIS agents dupe the suspects into writing letters of apology to the nonexistent girl’s mother. He also questions why the NCIS sends photographs of adult women to the service members when encouraging them to meet.

“NCIS is using the wrong bait. If they are really looking for pedophiles, then why don’t they send pictures of kids?” he said in a recent interview.

Highlighting the NCIS’s mishandling of the operations, explains Bilecki, is one case tried in March 2016. Following the arrest of a marine staff sergeant, he says, the female sailor playing the role of the young girl gave the suspect her real mobile telephone number and later engaged in sexual relations with him. According to Bilecki, the sailor was consequently removed from her position.

The marine ultimately received a sentence of 15 years in prison — partly due to his sexual relationship with a real high school girl, which was uncovered during the investigation. The final sentence was reduced to two years because of a pre-trial agreement.

Seattle-based lawyer Carpenter, who has represented one of the marines and advised others charged in the Okinawa sting, describes the operations as “a network of sophisticated law enforcement tricks.”

“These kids (service members) are bored — indeed the only outlet they have is the internet, which, for NCIS, is like shooting fish in a barrel, except for the fact that these young marines aren’t fish, they are human beings with families and friends,” he told The Japan Times.

The morality of the NCIS operations has sparked heated debate online. On June 25, 2016, Bilecki posted a video on his law firm’s Facebook page following his successful defense of a marine accused of offenses including attempted sexual assault and abuse of a child. In the video — also viewable on YouTube (bit.ly/bileckisting) — he accused the NCIS of “absolutely entrapping people into committing crimes they wouldn’t otherwise commit.”

The Facebook posting has garnered 126,000 views and more than 530 comments. Although many people appeared to agree with Bilecki’s view that the NCIS operations were unjustly ensnaring service members, other posters seemed to support the operations. “Sting or not (the service members) are showing up to sleep with little girls! NCIS is protecting our alliance with Japan!” wrote one commentator.

Almost eight months since the video was posted, Bilecki remains outspoken in his criticism of the NCIS. These operations, he says, are being conducted “like an assembly line” with very little oversight. They are designed to boost arrest rates and make the NCIS look good, he says.

In recent years, there have been other high-profile arrests of American pedophiles on Okinawa.

In January 2015, a marine chief warrant officer admitted to 18 charges of sex crimes against children, some of which involved a child under the age of 12. He was sentenced to 144 years in military prison by a military judge at Camp Foster but the term was reduced to 20 years due to an agreement with the court.

In July 2015 a civilian employee at Kadena Air Force Base was convicted of sexually assaulting a minor on the base and filming the attack with his mobile phone. At a trial that took place in the U.S., he was sentenced to five years in prison.

Meanwhile, an undated case posted on the website of the Dallas-based law firm of Stephen P. Karns details how a first lieutenant in the army, stationed at Kadena, was arrested for possession of “983 image files and 41 multimedia (movie) files of suspected child pornography.” The soldier was allowed by his command to resign instead of facing a court martial, and it appears he did not receive any other punishments. Nor was he required to register as a sex offender.

“This high number of cases suggests there is a real problem with sex offenses in the U.S. military on Okinawa,” says Manabu Sato, a professor of political science at Okinawa International University. “Whenever there is an incident off-base involving a service member, the military likes to claim it is a one-off but these cases show such behavior is not an exception. If the military cannot even protect people within its bases then how can they claim to be able to prevent crimes from occurring off-base in Okinawan communities?”

On March 10, the first pretrial conference for Kenneth Franklin Shinzato is scheduled to be held at Naha District Court. The former U.S. Marine is charged with the rape and murder of a 20-year-old Okinawan woman in the city of Uruma last April. The crime ratcheted up anti-military tensions in the prefecture, host to the majority of U.S. installations in Japan.

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Alt-rights that are against Third World immigrants, against Muslim refugees, or against gay men got it wrong. Feminism is the enemy. Nothing else. And because women are natural cowards, the more violence there is, the quicker they will abandon feminism.

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I Woke Up From A Coma Locked-In My Own Body

I woke up from my medically-induced coma and quickly felt like I was fully conscious. However, for two weeks, I was assessed as vegetative.

I was still good-fun-Kate and actually very much unconscious - a state where I was aware of my thoughts and everything around me - just completely unable to give any communication signal. I guess it was the closest feeling to waking up inside your own coffin. I wasn’t dead or bloody vegetative, I’d suffered a huge brainstem stroke and was diagnosed with locked-in syndrome to boot. Like 20-40% of those declared vegetative, I was misdiagnosed.

I didn’t understand how this could happen to me. I was a 39-year-old, 70-mile-a-week running mum, who was in training to scale Kilimanjaro, via the dangerous Western Breach, for my 40th birthday in five months’ time.

I over thought 24/7, seven days per week and felt horrific anxiety and fear. Fear that my husband may be encouraged to switch off my life support machine in the early days. I also suffered severe boredom, sleeplessness - because you slept out of boredom during the day - and experienced graphic hallucinations, that no one warned me or my family about. I was scared shitless of dying, then at other times, I wished I could physically pull the plug on my own life support machine.

I could feel hands massaging my lifeless body, but my brain was completely powerless to instruct my body to move. Quite often, I would hear frantic medical activity around me while my medical saviours tried to rescue and save yet another beloved family member in a bed nearby. I’ll never forget the relatives’ cries of sadness, pain and grief, in the immediate aftermath of death. I’d never seen a dead body before, so that also scared and upset me.

The thought of dying prematurely and leaving my young kids motherless, tormented me and the separation anxiety from my three young dependent kids - India (10), Harvey (8) and Woody (5) - was agonising and all encompassing. I longed to see them and be able to comfort them, though that wasn’t physically possible. When they did visit - two weeks after my stroke - they weren’t even allowed to lie next to me on my bed for health and safety reasons.

After eight months in hospital I discharged myself, in a wheelchair, doubly incontinent and with no real voice. I had to be at home with my children. Walking out of hospital was the furthest I had walked since my stroke.

Once at home I worked with a physiotherapist every single day. I wanted to be able to run again on the first anniversary of my stroke. Within six weeks I was completely out of my wheelchair and walking with crutches. Another six weeks later and on the day before my year anniversary I did this - my first stroke anniversary shuffle. And I didn’t stop there - fast forward 21 months and I ran a 10k race.

Going public with my story to help others has been my passion since my ‘bomb exploded’ seven years ago. I became the voice for less able people when I ran my global charity - Fighting Strokes - back in 2011. I still offer patient visits, advocacy and pioneer research to help what I consider to be the most vulnerable people in society. I consider myself a stroke activist. Ultimately, communication is a basic human right as I stressed a year ago in my TEDx talk. Every stroke is individual and different as is our response to it.

Success is just the tip of an iceberg. Failures, persistence, sacrifice, discipline, hard work and disappointment, have been my best friends in last seven years. Nowadays, I’m just trying to be the best version of me & adapt to my new ‘imperfect’ normal. I’m absolutely passionate about helping the less able, who are abandoned, invisible and left without a voice. I realise I’m the ultimate marmite kid - love me or hate me - but I’d rather try (and fail) in life, than not try at all.

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Butea superba is the most dangerous gateway drug on the planet. It opens the gate of the female vagina to about any male who happens to be around.

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Hizbul Mujahideen Video Shows Brutal Torture Of Kashmiri Youths For Being 'Police Informers'

Terror outfit Hizbul Mujahideen has posted a video which shows two Kashmiri youths being beaten up for allegedly being police informers. The seven-minute video opens with a logo and a message from Hizbul.

The video shows two young men confined in a dark room, being confronted by Hizbul men. While their hair is being shaved off, a ticker on the video read,

"Breaking news: Assalamualaikum: ye wo gaddar hai jo police mai SPO bharti hone ke liye mujahideen ki khabar Hindustani kutton ko dete hain (They are those traitors who provide information about militants to Indian dogs for getting jobs in the police as SPOs)."

The two young men are seen pleading for mercy with folded hands. The militants then go on to make the two men 'confess' about their role, as informants.

One of the unidentified youths is heard saying "that they were promised of police jobs in exchange of information about Mujahideen".

After they are made to apologise for their 'mistake' the video further shows the two men being beaten up with sticks, while a text says this is a message for all traitors.

It further shows one of the men being thrown around like rag dogs as he pleads to end the torture until he collapses on the floor.

The militants then turn to the second youths and forcefully dips his head into a bucket of water and beat him.

The updated video is said to be shot in South Kashmir, even though it is yet to be ascertained. It is also unclear how the video got posted online at a time when most parts of the valley is facing internet blockade.

The video is in line with the earlier threats of Zakir Musa, Hizbul the commander, who succeeded slain terrorist Burhan Wani.

n a number of videos posted online in the recent past, Musa had warned Kashmiri youths of dire consequences if they act against them. He had claimed that they are aware of the identity of the 'traitors' and they would be dealt accordingly.

In a video, he had also warned Kashmiris who work in the police department about consequences on them and their families.

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There is a new solution coming up for ugly old women. Normally they would just become man-hating feminists. But soon they can have their brains transplanted into a sex doll, and feel beautiful again.

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