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What a beheading feels like

What a beheading feels like

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You can always pep up your website with imagery on the killing and torture of me. Nobody cares. Cruelty towards men is accepted. But showing physical love of people below the age of 18 can earn a punishment much worse than that for torturing and killing a man. That's the world today. The result of feminism, the ideology by which ugly women want to protect their market value as sex objects by eliminating anything that undermines their hold on men.

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Sadomasochist accused of strapping woman to 'torture board' and sending 240 volts through vagina CLEARED of sexual assault

A self-confessed sadomasochist accused of strapping a woman to a 'torture board' and sending 240 volts through her vagina has been cleared of sexual assault.

Road worker Keiren Batten, 43, was "obsessed with sadomasochistic sexual practices", a jury was told.

Prosecutor Simon Wilshire told them he "used" a 27-year-old woman "to satisfy his physical, dangerous sexual desires re bondage, sadism and restraint."

Batten stood trial on one count of sexual assault which related to the incident involving his homemade electric torture board.

The complainant claimed he attached crocodile clips to her labia while she was strapped to the restraint board he had made from plywood and pet collars and belts.

In his defence, Batten, from Hitchin, Herts, told a jury in fact it was he who had submitted to painful sexual practices.

He denied having electrocuted the complainant via her vagina.

He also claimed his own genitals had been left scarred after the woman used a blowtorch on them and that she also carved her name into his thigh with a Stanley knife.

A jury cleared Batten of sexual assault and another count of assault relating to an accusation he had pushed the woman during an argument.

Jurors could not come to a verdict on a charge of assault relating to a head butt.

Prosecutors have a week to decide whether to retry Batten on the matter.

During the trial at Cambridge Crown Court, the jury of seven woman and five men were asked to join the judge and barristers to examine to homemade torture board.

Defence barrister Neil Fitzgibbon asked Batten to lie down on the board in court and strap himself to it using the head, body, arm and leg collars, belts and chain.

Judge Farrell came down from his bench to stand with barristers and jurors to examine Batten's demonstration on the floor of the court.

Jurors were also shown explicit photographs of Batten's genitals bearing the branding and burn marks.

The complainant told the court she went along with some of the kinky sex because Batten said she was "boring" in bed.

Twice she was electrocuted through her nipples.

But, she claimed Batten on another occasion connected the lead to her vagina although she had said he must not.

"He put the crocodile clips inside, attached to my labia, and shocked me," she said.

"He turned it on and I just caught my breath because you think you are going to die.

"I have never experienced anything so hideous in my life.

"I never went on the board again.

"After that 'I was rubbish in bed' and 'everybody else was better', 'I was just a prude'."

The witness said: "He calls it a torture and it is torture really.

"As I got a bit braver I said no and that's when he got bored and went elsewhere."

In cross-examination, she accepted she carved her name with a Stanley knife into his inner thigh, but denied she used a blowtorch or the shocker on him.

Batten had earlier pleaded guilty to criminally damaging a mobile phone and taking a hammer to a wall at the complainant's home and has been remanded in custody to be sentenced for those offences on 2 May.

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The best investment a rich man can do, is one into destruction. Destruction of the surrounding world, near and far, makes his wealth more valuable.

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Of all emotions, those negative are the most real. If you hate, you know that you are healthy. Your hormones are in balance if you can still imagine how you would inflict a slow,painful death on your enemies. Love isn't an emotion really but rather a mixed bag of feelings, with selfish desire a prominent component. Of any positive expression of the human mind, sympathy is probably the most genuine, though it may come with rage towards those whose victim is the target of our sympathy.

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Locked-in syndrome: rare survivor Richard Marsh recounts his ordeal

When Richard Marsh had a stroke doctors wanted to switch off his life-support – but he could hear every word but could not tell them he was alive. Now 95% recovered, he recounts his story

Two days after regaining consciousness from a massive stroke, Richard Marsh watched helplessly from his hospital bed as doctors asked his wife, Lili, whether they should turn off his life support machine.

The Guardian's Token The 'why do you walk like that?' episode – Token podcast Leah Green and Fred McConnell are joined by Gideon Goldberg, their token disabled friend Listen Marsh, a former police officer and teacher, had strong views on that suggestion. The 60-year-old didn't want to die. He wanted the ventilator to stay on. He was determined to walk out of the intensive care unit and he wanted everyone to know it.

But Marsh couldn't tell anyone that. The medics believed he was in a persistent vegetative state, devoid of mental consciousness or physical feeling.

Nothing could have been further from the truth. Marsh was aware, alert and fully able to feel every touch to his body.

"I had full cognitive and physical awareness," he said. "But an almost complete paralysis of nearly all the voluntary muscles in my body."

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The first sign that Marsh was recovering was with twitching in his fingers which spread through his hand and arm. He describes the feeling of accomplishment at being able to scratch his own nose again. But it's still a mystery as to why he recovered when the vast majority of locked-in syndrome victims do not.

"They don't know why I recovered because they don't know why I had locked-in in the first place or what really to do about it. Lots of the doctors and medical experts I saw didn't even know what locked-in was. If they did know anything, it was usually because they'd had a paragraph about it during their medical training. No one really knew anything."

Marsh has never spoken publicly about his experience before. But in an exclusive interview with the Guardian, he gave a rare and detailed insight into what it is like to be "locked in".

"All I could do when I woke up in ICU was blink my eyes," he remembered. "I was on life support with a breathing machine, with tubes and wires on every part of my body, and a breathing tube down my throat. I was in a severe locked in-state for some time. Things looked pretty dire.

"My brain protected me – it didn't let me grasp the seriousness of the situation. It's weird but I can remember never feeling scared. I knew my cognitive abilities were 100%. I could think and hear and listen to people but couldn't speak or move. The doctors would just stand at the foot of the bed and just talk like I wasn't in the room. I just wanted to holler: 'Hey people, I'm still here!' But there was no way to let anyone know."

Locked-in syndrome affects around 1% of people who have as stroke. It is a condition for which there is no treatment or cure, and it is extremely rare for patients to recover any significant motor functions. About 90% die within four months of its onset.

Marsh had his stroke on 20 May 2009. Astonishingly, four months and nine days later, he walked out of his long-term care facility. Today, he has recovered 95% of his functionality; he goes to the gym every day, cooks meals for his family and last month, he bought a bicycle, which he rides around Napa Valley, California, where he lives.

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But he still weeps when he remembers watching his wife tell the doctors that they couldn't turn off his life support machine.

"The doctors had just finished telling Lili that I had a 2% chance of survival and if I should survive I would be a vegetable," he said. "I could hear the conversation and in my mind I was screaming 'No!'"

Locked-in syndrome is less unknown than it once was. The success of the 2007 film, The Diving Bell and the Butterfly, the autobiography of the former editor of French Elle magazine editor, Jean-Dominique Bauby, brought awareness of the condition to the general public for the first time.

Then in June, Tony Nicklinson challenged the law on assisted dying in England and Wales at the High Court as part of his battle to allow a doctor to end a life he said was "miserable, demeaning and undignified". Judgment was reserved until the Autumn.

Marsh, however, did something almost unheard of: he recovered. On the third day after his stroke, a doctor peered down at him and uttered the longed-for words: "You know, I think he might still be there. Let's see."

The moment that doctor discovered Marsh could communicate through blinking was one of profound relief for Marsh and his family – although his prognosis remained critical.

"You're at the mercy of other people to care for your every need and that's incredibly frustrating, but I never lost my alertness," he said. "I was completely aware of everything going on around me and to me right from the very start, unless when they had me medicated," he said.

"During the day, I was really lucky: I never spent a single day when my wife or one of my kids wasn't there. But once they left, it was lonely – not in the way of missing people but the loneliess of knowing there's no one there who really understands how to communicate with you."

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The only way for Marsh to sleep, was to be medicated. That, however, only lasted four hours, after which there had to be a three-hour pause before the next dose could be administered.

In questions submitted by Guardian readers to Marsh ahead of this interview one asked about his experience of his hospital care while the staff did not think he was conscious. Marsh said: "The staff who work at night were the newest and least skilled, and I was totally at their mercy. I felt very vulnerable. I did get injured a couple of times with rough handling and that always happened at night. I knew I wasn't in the best of care and I just counted the minutes until I would get more medicine and just sleep.

In response to another question, about the right-to-die debate, Marsh said he has no opinion. All he will say is: "I understand the despair and how a person would reach that point." But he is co-writing a book that he hopes will inspire hope and provide information to victims of locked-in syndrome and their families.

"When they first told my family that I was probably locked-in, they tried to find information on the internet – but there wasn't any. One of my goals now is to change that … to be able to reach out to families who find themselves in the same situation that mine were in so they can help their loved ones.

"Time goes by so slow ... It just drags by. I don't know how to describe it. It's almost like it stands still.

"It's a terrible, terrible place to be but there's always hope," he added. "You've got to have hope."

• This article was amended on 10 August 2012. The original said that Tony Nicklinson had failed in his High court bid to change the law on assisted dying in England and Wales. This has been corrected.

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Alt-rights that are against Third World immigrants, against Muslim refugees, or against gay men got it wrong. Feminism is the enemy. Nothing else. And because women are natural cowards, the more violence there is, the quicker they will abandon feminism.

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Every man easily can become a Muslim. Just have to say the Shahada before some witnesses. And here we go.

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British paedophile gets life sentence for Malaysia, Cambodia crimes

British paedophile Richard Huckle was sentenced to life in prison by a London court on Monday for abusing 23 Malaysian and Cambodian babies and children over almost a decade.

Huckle, 30, stood in the dock at London’s Old Bailey court with his hands clasped together as if in prayer as he was told that he would have to serve at least 23 years behind bars for his crimes against victims aged 6 months to 11 years.

“It is very rare indeed that a judge has to sentence sexual offending by one person on such a scale as this,” judge Peter Rook said.

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Actually, if they can live with the fact that men have a sexuality to cope with, and if they aren't feminists, women, at least some of them, are quite OK.

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America and Europe are evil. Let them self-destruct by fostering sexual hatred. They will kill each other, and the system will kill itself.

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Claims for being awake during surgery -“Anaesthetic Awareness”

Our friendly team of specialist lawyers at Medical Solicitors help people who have suffered from negligent medical treatment leading to anaesthetic awareness. Compensation can be claimed where a patient has suffered pain and trauma from being aware during surgery due to Medical Negligence.

If you think that you have been awake during surgery, then something has gone wrong with the anaesthetic and you may be able to claim compensation for what is called ‘anaesthetic awareness’.

Do contact our friendly team of specialist lawyers at Medical Solicitors. We conduct most of our Clinical and Medical Negligence claims under ‘No Win, No Fee’ agreements, also known as Conditional Fee Agreements. So, you do not have to worry about how you are going to afford to bring a claim. You have nothing to lose in speaking to us.

When can anaesthetic awareness happen? Anaesthetic awareness can occur during surgery but also after surgery, in the recovery room. Also, after surgery in intensive care, where patients are kept sedated or tranquilised. It can occur whilst patients are paralysed (and intubated) and are connected to life-support machines.

Some patients may dream around the time of surgery. This is common (3 to 6%), but it does not constitute awareness and can confuse the issue. Patients may also recall sounds or conversations as well as the presence of airway devices still in their body as they regain consciousness. A patient may mistakenly think this was as awareness. On the other hand, true cases of being awake during surgery can be difficult to detect.

How often does being awake during surgery happen?

Doctors now recognise that patients being awake during surgery ocurrs more than many previously thought. Public awareness is also increasing, with cases involving failings in medical care receiving more attention in the media than ever before. Do you remember the 2007 Hollywood film “Awake” that drew many people’s attention to the subject? In addition, doctors have conducted research (through clinical trials involving large numbers of patients) that have shown that around 1 or 2 patients out of every 1000 experience some form of awareness.

How do patients know if they have been awake during surgery?

Some patients report anaesthetic awareness immediately after surgery. Others may not realise they were aware until days or even weeks after the event. A well-established method of detecting awareness involves the use of what is called a ‘Brice interview’. This method involves asking the following questions:

What was the last thing you remembered happening before you went to sleep? What was the first thing you remembered happening on waking? Did you dream or have any other experiences while you were sleep? What was the worst thing about your operation? What was the next worse thing? Consequences of anaesthetic awareness during surgery:

Awareness can lead to anxiety, fear of surgery and anaesthesia and sleep disturbances. It can also lead to flashbacks, nightmares and post-traumatic stress disorder or depression.

There are also consequences for the anaesthetist too. A study by the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) showed that 1.9% of claims were for anaesthetic awareness. The blame was put on substandard care, such as mistakes in drug labelling and administration.

Contributing factors:

There are often various causes of intra-operative awareness:

Misjudging the dose needed for a patient Problems tolerating side effects of anaesthetic agents Failure to detect that a patient is in a state of awareness, or light anaesthesia Problems with equipment and drug delivery Problems with anaesthetic side effects:

General anaesthesia can slow down the cardiovascular system. There are some types of surgery where anaesthetic doses may be deliberately reduced for safety, to maintain blood pressure. However, the risks of a patient then experiencing some degree of awareness during surgery does increase.

These typically include cardiac surgery, emergency or trauma surgery and Caesarean section. In Caesarean section, there are also concerns about the effects of general anaesthetic upon the unborn child, more so where there are pre-existing concerns about the unborn child.

Pre-operative checks:

A thorough history and examination can identify whether a patient is at greater risk of suffering anaesthetic awareness. Specific factors may include:

A history of previously having reported feeling awake during a surgery. Drug abuse. Also being a long-term user of opiates for chronic pain, heart and vascular problems. A previous history of difficult intubation or anticipated difficult intubation. Heart, Caesarean, emergency and trauma surgery carry higher risks of anaesthetic awareness. The anaesthetic technique may also increase the risk, if muscle relaxants are used. Also, the risks increase with the where the anaesthetic is given just by inhalation (this is called ‘TIVA’), rather than through the veins or if rigid bronchoscopy is used. If risk factors are present, this should be discussed with you and you may be offered medication (benzodiazepines) before the anaesthetic to relax you (called ‘pre-medication’).

Methods for reducing the risks during surgery:

Drugs (benzodiazepines) can be used at the start of anaesthesia, particularly if a difficulty is anticipated the intubation stage. There are other methods for managing blood pressure and heart rate, other than adjusting the level of anaesthetic. For example, using a vasopressor or an inotrope rather than continually reducing the anaesthetic concentration. Monitoring brain activity in a patient (through ‘EEG’) is a technique. However, this is not routinely used in the UK. It may also be worth considering using depth of anaesthesia monitoring when available (see below). Despite precautions and good technique, some cases of anaesthetic awareness will still occur. Anaesthetists’ records should be clear about when drugs were administered and in what dose. It should also be clear what forms of monitoring were used.

What should happen if a patient reports being awake during surgery?

If a patient complains of being awake during surgery, it is important a doctor visits them to identify exactly what has happened. It is necessary to differentiate between dreams or recall of events that represent real awareness. Denying the patient’s version of events may contribute to a worse psychological outcome for them so it is important to apologise for their experience and express some sympathy. Detailed written records of these processes are vital.

The patient should receive adequate psychological support afterwards not only in the form of a regular visit by the anaesthetist but with the referral for counselling or psychotherapy if necessary. The patient’s general practitioner should also be informed so that this information can be taken into account when future treatments may be planned.

Summary:

So, although being aware during surgery is a potentially devastating it is a rare event. It may not be possible to prevent every case from happening, but it is possible to identify high-risk cases. Once risks have been identified your doctors can plan to reduce the risks. In any event, for all patients, doctors must take great care to avoid errors.

Follow our links below to quickly access our information pages about how we can help with: a complaint about care, funding a medical negligence claim for anaesthetic awareness, and more:

Follow our links below to quickly access our information pages about how we can help with: a complaint about care, funding a medical negligence claim and more:

defining your needs after poor medical care

complaining about care

Inquests

funding a medical negligence claim

Conditional fee agreements

Time limits

How are claims settled?

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Universal education for women is not in the interest of men. For some women, a good education is OK. For the majority, it is unneeded.

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With free speech, it's like that:

You can make any offending remarks about white men, and the mainstream media and mainstream opinion will applaud you. You can't say anything negative about feminism. Feminism is sacrosanct. Fuck it.

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